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African American History Month, George Washington Carver and Peanuts

George Washington Carver, former slave, Educator, Scientist and Agriculturist, whose work in Systematic Botany and Agriculture lead to the development of farm products as well as education and awareness to the Southern black community about crops, farming, sustainability, importance of natural resources and one’s own connection with nature.


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February is a month celebrating or creating awareness reflecting many important aspects of our history or culture. One February celebration that holds special meaning to me is Black History Month, also known as African American History Month. This annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom is held in remembrance of the important events and people in history within the African Diaspora.
Although now the celebration lasts throughout the month of February beginning in 1976, the precursor to Black History Month was “Negro History Week”. It was established in 1926 in the United States by historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH). This week was created to put forth the teachings of black or African American history as it was argued an essential need to ensure the physical and intellectual survival of the black race within or amongst the broader society. Woodson and ASNLH chose to make the second week of February, Negro History Week to mark the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas; the 12th and the 14th respectively, whom have played prominent roles in shaping black history.

As we look back on the historical milestones reached, my thoughts reflect upon the growth of our civilization and the progression of self preservation and medical care. The Ancient Egyptians, for instance, are known to have contributed to the development of medicine as they have produced the first physicians, medical knowledge and medical literature. The further advancement of the field of medicine and the pledge to save lives was contributed by Charles Richard Drew, physician and medical researcher who developed improved techniques for blood storage or blood banks in early WWII. George Washington Carver, former slave, Educator, Scientist and Agriculturist, whose work in Systematic Botany and Agriculture lead to the development of farm products as well as education and awareness to the Southern black community about crops, farming, sustainability, importance of natural resources and one’s own connection with nature.
“His [Carver] research developed 325 products from peanuts, 108 applications for sweet potatoes, and 75 products derived from pecans…His work in developing industrial applications from agricultural products derived 118 products, including a rubber substitute and over 500 dyes and pigments, from 28 different plants. He was responsible for the invention in 1927 of a process for producing paints and stains from soybeans.

Carver had a way of making science and medicine more human and understandable. He was later famed for his role in finding commercial uses for Southern resources of which he educated his community on how to cultivate and harvest. Carver truly was a believer in the American dream and embodied the qualities necessary to achieve and contribute to the advancement of medicine, science, and the production of natural products from local resources like rubbing oils and salves, amongst many other things. When it comes to the greater scope of the advancement of human civilization, each and every one of us is a part of the creation of history and the progression of a people in unity. The advancements made with in the broader scope of medicine have paved the way for further integration and cooperation amongst fields that continue to play a role in newly refined ways to save and preserve life.
I encourage you to leave your mark and utilize the awareness of complementary medicine and integration to deepen the understanding and respect for the use of Eastern or complementary practices with in a Western world. Black History Month celebrates stories of survival, progression, passion, perseverance; elements and attributes we can all find some common relation to.



With Love,
Joslyn Williams, Director of Enrollment



TCM Health benefits of Peanuts, according to Dr. Mao



Considered neutral in traditional Chinese medicine, peanuts are used to improve appetite, regulate blood flow, alleviate insomnia, promote diuresis, treat edema, and aid lactation. Peanuts are a very good source of monounsaturated fats, the type of fat that is considered to provide cardiovascular protection. Peanuts are also a good source of other famous heart-healthy nutrients, including vitamin E, niacin, folate, magnesium, manganese, and more protein than any true nut. As a good source of niacin, peanuts contribute to brain health and blood flow, giving protection against Alzheimer’s disease and age-related cognitive decline. Recent research shows that peanuts rival the antioxidant content of many fruits and vegetables, especially when roasted. Additionally, peanuts are a major source of resveratrol, the chemical in red grapes and red wine that has been studied for its potential anti-aging effects, reduced cardiovascular disease, and reduced cancer risk.

(Source : http://www.askdrmao.com/)

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